With a borrowed car: Whose company pays?

If you lend your car to a friend and your friend has an accident, it might be your insurance that’s on the hook. It all depends on the insurance company that issued your policy. One company’s policy may state: “the insurance follows the car”; while another company’s policy says the driver’s insurance is the primary coverage even though you own the vehicle involved.Let’s take a look at the two different scenarios:

    • If the insurance follows the car and you lend your car to a friend, your coverage is considered the primary coverage. If your friend has an accident, it’s your insurance that will pay the claim. If the accident is serious enough to use up all of your policy’s coverage, then your friend’s coverage, which is considered secondary, might also be used.

 

  • If insurance follows the driver, coverage is provided the other way around. If you lend your car to a friend and they have an accident, it’s their policy that is considered primary coverage, meaning their insurance company will pay the claim. In this case, your policy would be secondary and wouldn’t pay for anything unless your friend’s policy limits were used up. All these rules go out the window in many cases if the person borrowing the car happens to be a relative who resides in the same household as the owner. You should read your policy carefully to see what type of coverage applies to you.


Remember these two things: First, always exercise caution when it comes to lending your car. Second, if you’re ever in doubt about whether you or another driver is covered in any given situation, please call us. 

Share this post?

Toth-Felty

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *